Creating Videos: Aim for Authenticity, Not Perfection

James Jensen was one of several hundred R4 attendees who packed the MGM Grand ballroom for Monday’s much-anticipated Video Summit, but the Broker/Owner of RE/MAX Lawn Realty in Grand Forks, North Dakota, already knows the power of online video.

Jenson says he became a believer after attending a Video Boot Camp hosted by RE/MAX Affiliates Michael Thorne with RE/MAX Little Oak Realty in Fort Langley, British Columbia, and Jesse Peters with RE/MAX One Group in Winnipeg, Manitoba, two of the headliners on stage for Monday’s Video Summit. The TED Talk-style session provided insights and tips from several experts, including Thorne and Peters, on how to maximize video in real estate marketing.

“The main stuff they teach you is that you can do it on a regular basis,” said Jensen, whose videos are typically viewed more than 2,000 times in a market of 6,500 people. “We started doing this consistently, and people watched it. The numbers are phenomenal. I’d go on a listing presentation and start to explain what they would be getting from me, and they’d say, ‘Oh, we know, we watch your videos.’”

Here are 10 other takeaways from the R4 session:

1. Tell a story by providing a “hook” and creating suspense, says Geoff McLennan with RE/MAX Advantage Realty in New Westminster, British Columbia. He cites a favorite book, “Story” by Robert McKee, that says, “We don’t get people’s attention by giving them information; we get it by withholding information,” thereby creating a desire to learn the outcome. Think about pacing and the order that you dispense information in your storytelling.

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2. Arrive early and set the scene when making videos of open houses, advises Candice Arlott with RE/MAX Results in Brisbane, Australia. This not only prepares you to shoot a better video, it shows people who you are and how much you care.

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3. Believe in what you’re doing and learn to take criticism in stride. “If someone says something bad about you (or your video), it’s not the end of the world,” Arlott says.

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4. Content value is more important than production valuesays Matt Mead, Visual Storyteller for BombBomb. He says to know your expertise, maintain an idea bank and when it comes to vlogging, comment on the biggest influencer, Mead says.

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5. Be yourself. People want to see imperfect people who are confident in who they are, Mead says. Don’t be afraid to be vulnerable.

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6. Learn to cut the cord on production and go with it. If you spend too much time producing something, it starts to drain the humanity out of it, Mead says.

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7. An iPhone 8 will do the job for almost any video project, and no external mic is necessary. That advice comes from Bruce Johnson with RE/MAX of Wasaga Beach in Wasaga Beach, Ontario. His three epic fundraising motorcycle trips for Children’s Miracle Network have resulted in proceeds totaling more than $600,000. Johnson’s other equipment: a small tripod, a GoPro 6 (for point-of-view footage) and a DII MavicAir Drone.

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8. Limit videos to 2 minutessays Tracy Thompson with RE/MAX Grand in Sauk City, Wisconsin. But, she says, make sure those few minutes are full of authenticity. “When people come up to me in the grocery store, they think they know me,” Thompson said. “Because I’ve exposed myself to them. I’ve let them in.”

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9. Use subtitles if wind or other noise drowns out your audio.

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10. Easily up the production quality with a lens that attaches to your iPhone.

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2 comments

Don’t be afraid to invest in yourself. My wife produces a weekly video for her facebook page from her Iphone however for my YouTube Channel, I use an Osmo Pocket that attaches to my phone and love it. I also use an external mic. If you proclaim in your market that you ARE the best…then BE the best. Use the right equipment, Study how to use it and make it as simply as possible. I use less than $500 in equipment to produce video tours for my listings.

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